How to use a safety pin prepping

Safety pin
How to use a safety pin prepping

Know the true value of a safety pin prepping.
While some people are wearing safety pins for political reasons*
they do not understand its true value in survival and its place in
history. You see, the same guy who invented the safety pin (to
protect your feelings), Walter Hunt, also invented a patented rifle
(to protect your life)!

Walter Hunt invented the forerunner of the Winchester repeating
rifle on August 21, 1849 when he patented the "combined piston
breech and firing cock repeating gun." Smithsonian.com credits
him as a "
Yankee Mechanical Genius." He had numerous other
inventions, such as the fountain pen.

Interestingly, Hunt also invented the sewing machine. He didn't
patent the idea for the sewing machine, however, because he
feared seamstresses might loose their occupation!

    *Safety pins in the U.K and America are gaining in
    popularity with Democrats. People in the U.K. began
    wearing safety pins after the British Exit and now some
    Americans are following suit after the elections claiming they
    are wearing it in solidarity of xenophonic abuse. A safety pin
    is a way of showing they are a "safe space" for those who
    are afraid of what the new administration will bring

    Xenophobia being fearful of something that's foreign,
    especially of strangers or of people from different countries
    or cultures. Miriam Webster describes xenophobia as the
    "fear or hatred of strangers or foreigners." .

So what use is a safety pin? For preppers, a safety pin has
survival uses!

Why are safety pins are in survival kits
The humble safety pin is among the 37 unusual things to hoard.
(it's #4 on the list)
.

Why stash safety pins in your preps? A safety pin has infinite
survival uses. With safety pins you can:

#1: Create an instant fish hook.
Fishing for dinner ideas? You may well be fishing in crisis.


















Above, Black Scout Survival shows how to make a survival fish hook.

#2: Craft an arm sling from T-shirt for first aid.
With a safety pin and a little ingenuity, you can craft a sling for
first aid use.

















Above, St. John Ambulance of the United Kingdom, the nations leading first
aid charity, demonstrates how to use a safetypin to make a sling.

#3: Improvise tweezers for splinter or tick removal.
Safety kits nearly always include a safety pin. It's not only
inexpensive, but it's extremely effective for removing a splinter or
a tick.

#4: Secure a cloth bandage.
Another first aid use of a safety pin is to make a bandage made
of cloth. Securing a
bandanna to make a bandage and compress
bleeding is a great reason to include a safety pin in your
emergency preparations, but there are many more ideas making it
worthy for your first aid kit.

#5: Make a finger splint.
A safety pin can provide the proper length of a rigid straight edge
with which to craft a makeshift finger split.

#6: Irrigate a wound precisely.
With a safety pin you can prick a hole in a plastic bag enabling
you to improvise a method of wound irrigation using your drinking
water to carefully clean a wound precisely and without wasting
too much of your precious water source.

#7: Dry your gear.
Think of a safety pin as a clothes pin. Imagine getting
waterlogged while camping outdoors. A safety pin can help secure
your gear inside your tent to hang stuff to dry or to secure
clothing to cordage so that it doesn't blow off into the dirt just
like a clothes pin, only with a more efficient size.

#8: Affix gear to your bugout bag.
A sturdy safety pin is immensely useful for affixing gear to your
bugout bag for easy retrieval.

  • Important note: The trick to securing your gear is to use
    the bottom of the safety pin. The circle at the bottom and
    not the  latch at the top.

#9: Mend a broken shoe lace.
Use a safety pin to connect your shoe lace enough so you can use
the longer cordage

#10: Makeshift gaiter.
Close your pant legs with a safety pin to keep out snow or ticks.

#11: Use it like a toothpick.
Get out food that's stuck from between your teeth as you would a
toothpick. You may as well add a safety pin to your dental medic
kit.

#12: Bring your gear together.
A safety pin can bring your gear together in a number of ways:
  • Add a layer of security to your zippered compartments of
    bags to deter theft or at least make pick pocketing more
    difficult and univitig
  • Never lose a sock or a mitten, you can pin pairs together.
  • More importantly, for survival you can use safety pins to
    connect blankets, bags, tarps or clothes to create shelter.

#13: Close wounds.
In extreme medical emergencies where no doctor is available you
can use a safety pin like a skin stapler to close wounds. Employ
it in much the same way as a
butterfly bandage.

#14: Open cans.
It's not easy, but you can open canned foods with a safety pin.

#15: Defend yourself.
A safety pin is a sharp point and, not to belabor the point, it can
put the hurt on someone to buy more time in self defense.

#16: Repair your clothes.
A safety pin has infinited uses to help you repair your clothing:























#17: Pick a lock.
There's no need to call a locksmith if you lost your keys! Here's
how to pick your own lock with a safety pin:


















Above, Howcast shows in a video how to pick a lock using a safety
pin.

Happy endings...
While people are wearing safety pins for political reasons, they
really are underscoring the true value: a safety pin can pull
together something that's broken. It’s important, now more than
ever, for America to stand unified as Americans and not to
destroy the country that we love!

Now you know how to use a safety pin prepping.  The secret is
"safe" with you.

More prepping articles...

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Safety pins have infinite uses for preppers
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