pantyhose for survival

multi-use survival tool: pantyhose

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panty hose for survival - weird survival tool
Pantyhose for survival
An ordinary pair of pantyhose could save your life!

She's got Leggs and she knows how to use it!
An old military trick is to wear pantyhose underneath socks to
minimize friction and to avoid blisters while hiking. With
pantyhose, you can stay warmer, keep ticks and chiggers at bay,
and also improvise a fishing net or filter water.

Discover the many weird, wacky and wonderful survival uses of
pantyhose...

Peculiar yet Practical ways for Prepping
with Pantyhose
Odd but true, pantyhose have several peculiar and practical
uses, which preppers in particular will appreciate:

#1: Prevent blisters.
Wear pantyhose underneath your hiking boots even if you're
man, and you'll avoid friction to prevent blisters. You'll also wick
away moisture to prevent trench foot. It will keep your feet
warmer and dryer than wool socks alone!

The pantyhose acts like a second skin and a barrier between you
and your boot to prevent chafing, blisters and cold feet. This well
known military trick is also popular with hikers and runners, and
preppers should take heed to pack some in their bugout bags.

  • NOTE: Trench foot results from inadequate protection of the
    feet against cold and moisture. Wet feet lose heat 25%
    faster than if they were dry. Untreated trench foot can lead
    to gangrene. To help avoid trench foot, thoroughly clean and
    dry your feet before putting on the clean and dry pantyhose
    and socks.

#2: Go incognito!
Another interesting use of pantyhose borrows from criminal
minds: use it as a face mask. Bank robbers wear pantyhose on
their heads to help blur their faces from video cameras and from
being recognized on the street. Preppers who may need to go
incognito for survival in a total collapse of society may like to
consider this unusual idea. At minimum, we just helped you find
this year's affordable Halloween costume! (You're welcome.)

If anything, the look of wearing pantyhose on the head is
intimidating, as one French comedian illustrates in the video
below. (Kids, don't try this at home.)



















Above, Remi Gallard demonstrates the power of pantyhose on the head.

#3: Improvise a mosquito net.
It's not criminal to forget your mosquito gear, but have no fear if
you remembered to pack the pantyhose in your bugout bag!
Worn around the arms or over your head (and of course around
the legs), pantyhose will deter mosquitoes from biting you. Give
it a try on your next outdoor adventure, and have a kick camping
like a criminal.

#4: Keep chiggers, ticks, and leeches at bay.
Pantyhose worn underneath socks will minimize the friction, but
while hiking it will also help keep chiggers and ticks from
reaching your legs. And if you're wading through murky leech-
infested waters, you'll prevent them from affixing directly to your
skin. That's more good reason to include pantyhose in your
bugout bag or camping backpack.

#5: Make a bola as a weapon for hunting or self
defense.
It's not the first thing that comes to mind when prepping with
pantyhose, but you should consider using pantyhose for self
defense. How? Sock a rock in it! And if you're hungry, think if it
as your meal ticket! Here's how...

  • Improvise a bola to hunt small game with pantyhose.
    Catch a small-game meal by inserting a heavy stone into
    the leg of the pantyhose, knotting it and then slinging it
    like a real bola at the animal. Generally bolas are three
    heavy objects tied together with cordage, but you could
    make a bola with just two or even four.

  • Grab pantyhose and a heavy object for self defense, too!
    Here's a ""souper" idea: if you don' have a heavy stone, you
    can find something else to insert into your pantyhose (or
    sock) and use it for self defense. In your kitchen you may
    have a heavy can of soda or a soup can to knock down an
    intruder or at least defend yourself without a gun.

Below is a traditional bola made of cordage and stones. To make
one out of pantyhose, cut three legs, insert a heavy object and
then tie them together.















#6: Devise a fishing Net.
Pantyhose are alluring indeed, and here's more good reason to
consider packing a pair of pantyhose in your bugout bag or
camping backpack.With pantyhose you can improvise a skimmer
net to catch crawdads, small fish, and frogs. It's easy enough to
make a net from pantyhose and an old wire hanger. Just stretch
the pantyhose leg over a loop you make from the wire after you
fashion it to the desired shape.

#7: Strain water for filtration.
Pantyhose can help strain water of leaves and debris as part of
the filtration process. Here are some examples of how to use
pantyhose for straining water to make it potable..

  • Rain harvesting debris strain. Use pantyhose to filter
    leaves and debris in rain barrels. Some rainbarrels have a
    filter

  • Preparing  potable water. For an emergency situation you
    may need to filter water of debris, you can use a pair of
    pantyhose to help. A Big Berkey Water Filter will do the
    major work, but a pair of pantyhose can provide  filtration.

  • Making a crude water filter. Water filtration when done for
    a survival situation with rocks, sand, and charcoal (not
    Kingston, which has chemicals, but real charcoal) is a viable
    option for securing potable water. It can be very effective
    when filtering these three ingredients through a pair of
    pantyhose.

#8. Improvise a cheesecloth or other strainer.
It might not be the BPA-free way to go, but in a pinch you could
strain food or water through a laundered pair of pantyhose. What
should you strain?

  • Nuts. Okay, it's a bit nutty, but it does make an ideal
    strainer for nut milk!

#9: First aid.
Pantyhose have a variety of first aid uses:

  • Secure a bandage: An interesting application is to use
    pantyhose to keep bandages securely in place. The
    pantyhose have the benefit of

  • Devise a tourniquet. Only use a tourniquet if you know how
    to use one properly. For example, a tourniquet is not for
    mitigating a snake bite. You could do more damage with
    improper use and death could result.


  • Set a splint. The purpose of a splint is to immobilize the
    appendage. Cordage and a straight object is all you need to
    secure a finger, leg or other body part in place with a splint
    until help arrives.

  • Make sling. The purpose of a sling is to allow the arm to
    rest. Be sure not to immobilize the arm too long or you will
    transfer pain to the shoulder.

  • Make a cold compress. Stuff pantyhose with ice to make a
    soothing wet compress.


#10: Hang fruit and vegetables.
Turning pantyhose into a mesh bag will allow you to aerate
fruits, vegetables and herbs.  

  • Make a "no fly" zone for your apples, oranges, peaches
    and pears. Store fruit in pantyhose to keep fruit flies from
    getting at your food.  

  • Keep onions and garlic from rotting. Onions benefit from
    hanging in a cool, dry and dark place, such as a pantry,
    closet, or cellar. To hang onions properly, tie a knot in
    between them so they have a chance to circulate in the air.
    You can employ the same method with garlic. Best of all,
    this means you'll have no more messy onion skins flapping
    around your kitchen.  

  • Be picky about potatoes. Keeping potatoes in a root cellar
    is ideal, but not every prepper has the luxury. Even with a
    root cellar, potatoes may well be worth storing in the
    pantyhose.  Potatoes need air to circulate to stay fresh (see
    also the risk of Botulism). To keep them fresh, hang
    potatoes in pantyhose.

  • Herb hanger. Hang mint, rosemary, lavender and other
    herbs so they can dry free from insects and dust.

#11: Mesh bag for drying soap.
A frugal trick of the Great Depression was to use a mesh bag to
get at all the last bits and pieces of soap. You could do the
same with a used, but clean pair of pantyhose to keep your soap
clean and dry.

  • Soap on a rope. For camp showers and hand washing,
    having soap on a rope is handy. Not only does the material
    allow for the soap to dry, but you can hang the soap for
    convenience, so that it doesn't slip away.

    BONUS: Make bits of soap last longer!

#12: Contrive a carry all pouch.
It's easy to turn pantyhose into a collection receptacle and in a
survival situation it may be necessary to transport food and
materials back to camp. What makes pantyhose such an ideal
materials for such purpose is that you can tie different sections
and the material stretches.

In an emergency situation, the carry all could help as the
following:

  • Bait Bag. Store bait while fishing or setting traps.

  • Food foraging. Collecting berries. As a carry all for camping
    collect berries or otherwise a vessel to help you forage in
    the wild.

  • Tinder pouch. Collecting fuzzy moss, bird's nest, cat tails,
    so you can get a fire going! You may also collect these
    items and allow them to dry following rains.

#13: Stock it away in a sachet.

  • Make moth balls. Got cedar sawdust? If so, you have the
    makings of a moth deterrent when combined with lemon
    rinds into the sock of a pair of pantyhose.

  • Make potpourri sachets with the lavender from your
    garden.

#14: Use as emergency cordage.
You'll be able to improvise cordage with a pair of pantyhose to
tie objects together. The combined properties of elasticity and
pantyhose strength make use as cordage possible. You can
improvise a bungee cord to tie gear to your car or bugout bag.
Tie objects together with pantyhose in the following ways:

  • Improvise restraints. Hand and foot restraints might be
    necessary during survival times to keep intruders locked
    until help arrives, interrogation / negotiation has passed, or
    resolution has been made. Pantyhose might also be used to
    gag the individual in question.

  • Devise a sling shot. As pantyhose are stretchy, clever is the
    prepper who might also use pantyhose to fashion a sling
    shot.

  • Create a useful mega rubber band. Perhaps the most
    clever way to use pantyhose for cordage is to use it like a
    rubber band. Do so by cutting pantyhose to one-inch circular
    bands. In this way they can be used as a fan belt, pony tail
    holder or large rubber band for any number of uses. Best of
    all, you can loop them together to create a stretchy chain.
    The ah-ha moment is when you realize the top band of the
    pantyhose makes the biggest faux rubber band. Use it, for
    example, to secure boxes without the aid of tape.

  • Craft an emergency fan belt from the rubber band
    method. This is an idea brought forth by automotive
    legend. Test it at your own theory. The point is to cut
    one-inch rubber band (and not just tie two ends
    together).

  • More ways to use pantyhose for emergency cordage:
  1. Build emergency shelter in the wilderness.
  2. Bundle kindling and firewood to transport it to your next
    camp.
  3. Hang small game in preparation for drying or dressing.
  4. Improvise a belt or a gaiter.

#15: Caring for Plants.
Pantyhose have dozens of applications for gardening, and we list
a few below...

  • Keeping soil in potted plants. Have the problem of soil
    escaping from your potted plants? When potting plants,
    layer soil in the mesh of pantyhose at the bottom layer of
    your pot. This will allow the water to strain, yet keep the
    precious soil intact. Never be soiled again!

  • Seed saving. "Brown bagging" or seed saving is the practice
    of harvesting and subsequently stockpiling seeds and tubers
    from herbs, flowers, grains and vegetables for use in the
    following years. To ensure you don't lose any seeds, you
    can tie the foot of the pantyhose to the seed pod so that
    they will drop safely into the mesh. Use twist ties to
    securely ensure the seed capture. This will not only prevent
    the seeds from dropping into the ground before you're ready
    to plant them, but it will also provide protection from birds
    who may otherwise feed on your seeds.

  • Making a compost "tea". Scraps of food can steep in a sort
    of "compost tea" using pantyhose to strain the scraps. The
    resulting "tea" can nourish your plants.

  • Growing perfect apples. Want to harvest the most
    luscious looking apples? Wrap a developing apple in
    pantyhose! The time to wrap is when the fruit is about the
    size of a marble. The pantyhose will stretch with your fruit
    as it grows, giving the fruit a protective layer. This barrier
    allows sunlight and rain to sustain it as it prevents insects
    from propagating, and that's how pantyhose can prevent
    larvae from digging into the flesh of your apples.

  • Staking tomatoes and other plants. Tying tomatoes to
    stakes is one clever way preppers can deal with the
    rambunctious plant. Remember to tie them loose enough for
    vines and stems to grow, yet secure enough to support
    them. Works also with peppers and sunflowers.

  • Making a melon hammock. Supporting the heavy weight of
    melons on the trellis with pantyhose is yet another clever
    way to use old pantyhose. The same concept applies to
    setting squash along the trellis.

  • Keep flying enemies away with a barrier. Use light flesh-
    colored pantyhose, to wrap your plant and protect it from
    the critters who'd otherwise like to maime it.

#16: Devising a pot scrubber.
Whether the need arises in camping or because of an economic
collapse, it's good to know you can re-purpose a laundered pair
of pantyhose as a pot scrubber. To use as a pot scrubber, cut off
one section of pantyhose at just below the knee and stuff the
remaining portion inside and knot to hold the material inside.
Flip any remaining portion of pantyhose over the bundle and knot
again to provide an extra layer of strength to hold your scrubber
together.

  • How to cake a cast iron pot scrubber: Cast iron requires
    cleaning without soaps, which may inadvertently flavor your
    next meals. To scrub cast iron clean, make a pot scrubber is
    with coffee grounds. Place old coffee grounds in the toe of
    the pantyhose and tie a knot. This will keep the coffee
    grounds from escaping and these grounds will help scrub
    away food particles. Read more about caring for your cast
    iron pots and pans.

#17: Temporarily repairing a screen door.
It's not pretty, but you can keep pesky flies, mosquitoes and
moths from entering your home through a broken screen with the
aid of stretchy pantyhose and duct tape. It's a stretch to say
that this idea could save your life, or is it? When you consider
the disease brought on by the ordinary housefly or the mosquito-
related diseases, like Chikungunya,
Dengue, Malaria and West
Nile Virus, maybe it's not such a stretch after all!

Eight More Fabulous and Frugal Uses for
Pantyhose:
Here are five more frugal uses for pantyhose (non-survival, but
clever indeed):

  • #1: Storing yarn neatly, so it doesn't unravel.

  • #2: Polishing and dusting around the house. Reusing
    pantyhose as a polishing cloth to clean mirrors saves you
    money of paper towels.

  • #3: Straining paints. Sometimes flecks of dried paint get
    into a can or the paint itself gets clumpy. It's difficult to
    paint if these flecks and clumps get on the brush. To
    remedy this problem, just filter the paint through the
    pantyhose into your paint tin.

  • #4: Helping with manicures. Substitute pantyhose for
    cotton balls to remove nail polish. It will be more effective
    than ordinary cotton balls at wiping away the old polish.

  • #6: Keeping candles perfect. Buff out imperfections of a
    fancy candle with pantyhose.

  • #5: Tidying up wrapping paper. Keep your wrapping paper
    neat by using one leg of the pantyhose for each partially
    used roll of wrapping paper. It will prevent the paper from
    tearing, allowing you to use it all up.

  • #6: Finding lost objects. Vacuum to retrieve tiny precious
    objects. Place the foot of the pantyhose at the suction end
    of your vacuum cleaner to find tiny lost pieces, like a gold or
    silver earring back. The dust and air will circulate through
    the vacuum, but you'll be able to see and retrieve your tiny
    valuable. You might say, this idea is golden!

  • #7: Keeping warm while keeping out the draft. Stuff a
    pantyhose leg with old towels, socks or clothes to fill in the
    gap of air underneath doors and near windows.

  • #8: Cleaning your gun. There's no lint in a pantyhose gun
    cleaning rag!

Finally, here's an idea to cling on: pantyhose with water will help
you get rid of static electricity. Rub the wet pantyhose where you
have static cling and watch the pantyhose neutralize the energy
on the pantyhose you're wearing.

Happy endings...
Now you have a leg up not only when it comes to how to use
pantyhose for economic survival, but possibly also for surviving
an emergency situation or making your life more comfortable
camping.

So put on a pair next time you go camping, The benefits of
wearing them for a survival scenario include:
  1. Gaiter for preventing chiggers, ticks, and leeches.
  2. Prevent blisters and avoid trench foot.
  3. Improvise a mosquito net.
  4. Add a layer of warmth to prevent frostbite

Pantyhose nowadays are rarely worn at anything, but funerals
and weddings. You may get two to five uses out of them before
they rip and become useless in a woman's wardrobe, but don't
throw them away!

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